Technology changes how authors write, but the big impact isn’t on their style

Technology changes how authors write, but the big impact isn’t on their style

“Our writing instruments are also working on our thoughts.” Nietzsche wrote, or more precisely typed, this sentence on a Malling-Hansen Writing Ball, a wondrous strange contraption that looks a little like a koosh ball cast in brass and studded with typewriter keys.

Anne Fadiman once claimed she could detect the “spoor” of word processing in other writers’ prose.

This article is about tech and its impact on style, perhaps voice, too. If I wrote three posts–one by hand and wordprocessed verbatim, one via WordPress and one via mobile device– could Fadiman be right? An interesting experiment. Should I try it? You tell me in the comments or the margins with Hypothes.is.

Adult Coloring Books, the British Museum, and the Adjacent Possible

Here is how I took a little pause from #clmooc today.

Public domain from the British Museum. Click on image to go to site.

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Adult coloring book treatment using the image manipulation tool SnagIt, but you can use the fill/eyedropper tool on any similar tool to get the colorizing done. You will note that my banner is this image.

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Took a quote from Simon Ensor’s post and used Visual Poetry to do the layout.

hope is very much

Used the same technique to color it with SnagIt.

hope is very muchyellow background

Sometimes the doors are opened by an unexpected attraction of very dissimilar elements.  That’s an academic way of saying “Shit happens.”  And in a good way, a handy way.  In this case I remembered a very cool gif that Ronald created a while ago

Combine that with the British Museum public domain flood of a million images and some recent work by Susan Watson using zentangles and gifs and the adjacent door in this amazing just opened on its secret hinges.

I know that others of you out there might say, “What;s the big deal? It’s just the fill tool in any image manipulation tool, right?” True, it’s my little deal and it’s fun and useful and I thought it was one of those classic ways that repertoire and connection work to happily complexify one’s play life: Vive Homo Ludens
 

Raise the Bar: Eight Reasons I Hate Your Screencast by Mark Lassoff : Learning Solutions Magazine

Raise the Bar: Eight Reasons I Hate Your Screencast by Mark Lassoff : Learning Solutions Magazine

Screencasts-digital video recordings of computer screens, often with audio narration or added video of an instructor-have been a staple for teaching developers and software users. But many screencasts are ineffective or even counterproductive because of poor planning and execution. Here are eight common faults of screencasts, with ways to improve the quality of your productions.

My screencasts are terrible. Sometimes necessarily so. Most times I wish I could follow the really useful advice given here in this article. It is a quick read with clear rationales for his suggestions. If I were to teach a media tech course I would definitely steal the ideas in here.

I would also like to know what tools he uses to make his screencasts like “breaking the instructor out of the box”. Yeah, I gotta figure out how to do that as well as figure out a sensible, sustainable workflow. I now have as a goal the creation of one, non-sucky screencast for my online Intro to Lit class this fall.

I’ll let you know how it all works out in an adventure-filled screencast coming to a browser near you.