Slacking Is Not a Dirty Word

This morning I came across this post in Brainpickings apropos of Labor Day to come and May Day just passed.

Leisure, the Basis of Culture: An Obscure German Philosopher’s Timely 1948 Manifesto for Reclaiming Our Human Dignity in a Culture of Workaholism

I stripped out the relevant links using LinkGrabber and put them into Dropbox’s Papers. Since Papers doesn’t provide an embed (unlike its now open-source predecessor Hackpad did) I had to save it into Google Docs and get an embed from there. See below.

I then opened up Webrecorder.io in my browser and “archived” all the links I grabbed from the page.  Sorry for the generic embed below, but Webrecorder doesn’t appear to be embeddable. (Update: Yes it is!)

You can go to the link here.
Or you can download the desktop software, download the web archive, and view it there.

Now I get to ask: Why?

I have a webarchive of pages and objects from within all the pages I gathered.  That means text, images, and videos in this case.  You do not get any links inside the archive unless you have opened them while the recorder was  recording.

Perhaps I could use it for:

  1. A collection of readings on a syllabus so that all students have open access to materials,
  2. A reading list for a course,
  3. A course-in-a- box, the box being the archive,
  4. Resources for those with low bandwidth (put it on a USB drive),
  5. Archiving government sites that are precarious,
  6. Check out how NetFreedomPioneers are using Webrecorder.io in their Project Toosheh to archive the net for parts of the world with no net access using filecasting,
  7. Save live video broadcasts and check out this use of Periscope and Webrecorder.io

  8. Old applets can live on like this one in Java that is unplayable otherwise.

  9. Creating self-contained journal articles like this one in Google’s new journal, Distill.

It is amazing and the possibilities just keep on rolling.  Add some more in the comments or feel free to hypothesize in the margins.

 

We Deliver Stuff. Learning? Acquired, Never Delivered.

 

I am finishing out my term with finals this week.  ‘Twas the best. ‘Twas the worst.  Now, I am casting my line into the river that runs through my life and three fish strike at my fly.

1. The Knowledge and Learning Transfer Problem

2. Betting the Spread on Inexorables

3.

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The first is the source of my text and image. The second is from Venkatesh Rao’s newsletter “Breaking Smart”. The third is from James C. Scott, author of the acclaimed, Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed.

There is a river that runs through them. I am fishing it. The current is swift and cold as it runs off the high sierra.  I wait,  creel ready with a few salmon already inside.

Here are a three gems, all shiny and sleek rainbows

Venkatesh Rao, “Here’s the basic truth about planning: you cannot plan better than you can predict.”

Charles Jennings, “The incessant desire to hear about ‘best practice’ is really a need to hear about good practice and emerging practice. In other words, people are actually asking ‘tell me about the things that work for you. They might give us some good insights if we can apply them in our own way’. There is no ‘best practice’ where there are different environments and processes.”

James C. Scott, “The condensation of history, our desire for clean narratives, and the need for elites and organizations to project an image of control and purpose all conspire to convey a false image of historical causation. They blind us to the fact that most revolutions are not the work of revolutionary parties but the precipitate of spontaneous and improvised action (“adventurism,” in the Marxist lexicon), that organized social movements are usually the product, not the cause, of uncoordinated protests and demonstrations, and that the great emancipatory gains for human freedom have not been the result of orderly, institutional procedures but of disorderly, unpredictable, spontaneous action cracking open the social order from below . ”