Browser History Twister

Yesterday, Wendy Taleo responded to my idea in a tweetchat about using browser histories to “doodle” with. She created the image below, then I created a thinglink to add digital objects to the image.  You can do the same. There are no rules.  Click on image anywhere and then edit it with the little pencil icon in the corner.  Doodle away.  Doodle whatevs. Thanks, Wendy, for taking hold of the improvisational spirit of the doodle.

 

Breadcrumbs

Kevin suggested a poetry link from the NYTimes on poets annotating their own poems. I wish more poets would do this as well as open up their poems to social annotation. Can you imagine the conversations that might emerge? I can. Below is the poem I chose:

I took one of the images in the story and, using Diigo’s very simple screenshot annotation tool, marked up what the poets had marked. It was an annotation of the conversation the poet held with himself.  Think of it as call and response.  If you are a human being you can do this. No fancy skills needed.

This work inspired a #smallstory in my Mastodon account.

This post is the breadcrumb. And imagine that we are all laying down breadcrumbs for each other.  Eat them while they are fresh. Of maybe a better comparison is a doodle that one person passes to another until, like the game of telephone, the message is transformed. Utterly.

Slacking Is Not a Dirty Word

This morning I came across this post in Brainpickings apropos of Labor Day to come and May Day just passed.

Leisure, the Basis of Culture: An Obscure German Philosopher’s Timely 1948 Manifesto for Reclaiming Our Human Dignity in a Culture of Workaholism

I stripped out the relevant links using LinkGrabber and put them into Dropbox’s Papers. Since Papers doesn’t provide an embed (unlike its now open-source predecessor Hackpad did) I had to save it into Google Docs and get an embed from there. See below.

I then opened up Webrecorder.io in my browser and “archived” all the links I grabbed from the page.  Sorry for the generic embed below, but Webrecorder doesn’t appear to be embeddable. (Update: Yes it is!)

You can go to the link here.
Or you can download the desktop software, download the web archive, and view it there.

Now I get to ask: Why?

I have a webarchive of pages and objects from within all the pages I gathered.  That means text, images, and videos in this case.  You do not get any links inside the archive unless you have opened them while the recorder was  recording.

Perhaps I could use it for:

  1. A collection of readings on a syllabus so that all students have open access to materials,
  2. A reading list for a course,
  3. A course-in-a- box, the box being the archive,
  4. Resources for those with low bandwidth (put it on a USB drive),
  5. Archiving government sites that are precarious,
  6. Check out how NetFreedomPioneers are using Webrecorder.io in their Project Toosheh to archive the net for parts of the world with no net access using filecasting,
  7. Save live video broadcasts and check out this use of Periscope and Webrecorder.io

  8. Old applets can live on like this one in Java that is unplayable otherwise.

  9. Creating self-contained journal articles like this one in Google’s new journal, Distill.

It is amazing and the possibilities just keep on rolling.  Add some more in the comments or feel free to hypothesize in the margins.