Mapping User Experience to the University Experience in #Mapvember

UX Mapping Methods Compared: A Cheat Sheet

I stumbled over these handy user experience maps this morning and thought about how useful they might be in my teaching, learning, and research.

Empathy maps: designed to help folk understand the mind of the user.

empathy map in four quadrants with user in the middle.

I could use this at the end of the semester to understand how my students navigated the semester-long research paper we write. I have no idea how my “users” experience the most time-consuming and constraining activity in the course. This could help.

Customer journey maps: describes the path a user takes in adopting a particular product or service.

journey into adopting (or not) a product or service

My department could use this in exploring how our students adopt the English major and how that journey works from inside the student. I suspect that the journey we lay out for them and the one they actually follow are quite different, complementary but different. We just revised our curriculum. This might be a qualitative way to evaluate whether the path we are requiring is one that those who are taking it signed up for.

Service blueprints: much like the customer journey maps, these apply to teachers/employees. These maps help to uncover the how and where we ‘touch’ our learners/customers. They would work in conjunction with the customer journey maps.

We could use these with new teachers to help map out where they see these ‘touchpoints’ and compare those maps with what the department sees as the touchpoints. I think these maps might be fleshed out using tools like Dave Snowden’s Cynefin Framework/SenseMaker techonology.

Experience maps: these take customer-journey maps and apply them across user types and user products. You use these maps to make generalizations about user experience. In this image, the experience mapped is “pregnancy”.

Since the purpose of these maps is to understand a general human behavior, I might use them to explain the arc of a course and the learning behaviors it might generate in students. The follow up would be whether those behaviors were actually generated in the users. This map is quite a bit fuzzier and more abstract than the others, so perhaps it might be used in planning or revising a course syllabus and then making readjustments on the fly to the course as required. Used in conjunction with empathy maps?

Maps like these are often guilty of the sin of ‘making complexity legible’. Or as James C. Scott says, they destroy the “metis”, the local knowledge, or at the least they valorize this legibilizing over local, folk knowledge and concepts. Entering with an awareness of this bias, I think that what could be revealed would allow teachers and admins insights that might lead to a ‘re-messification’ of the various ‘fields of users’. We could make our blind spots legible with the end goal being to make the relationships more natural, more like what we find in the margins of fields. Rich. Diverse. Messy. Convergent and divergent.

That is the idea I took from this foray into UX. Anybody need a really interesting research project that might be turned into a consulting business? Maybe this is it. There is a UX conference in Washington, D.C. in April. If I can find $5000 I might go. A big investment, but maybe a worthy career move.

Slacking Is Not a Dirty Word

This morning I came across this post in Brainpickings apropos of Labor Day to come and May Day just passed.

Leisure, the Basis of Culture: An Obscure German Philosopher’s Timely 1948 Manifesto for Reclaiming Our Human Dignity in a Culture of Workaholism

I stripped out the relevant links using LinkGrabber and put them into Dropbox’s Papers. Since Papers doesn’t provide an embed (unlike its now open-source predecessor Hackpad did) I had to save it into Google Docs and get an embed from there. See below.

I then opened up Webrecorder.io in my browser and “archived” all the links I grabbed from the page.  Sorry for the generic embed below, but Webrecorder doesn’t appear to be embeddable. (Update: Yes it is!)

You can go to the link here.
Or you can download the desktop software, download the web archive, and view it there.

Now I get to ask: Why?

I have a webarchive of pages and objects from within all the pages I gathered.  That means text, images, and videos in this case.  You do not get any links inside the archive unless you have opened them while the recorder was  recording.

Perhaps I could use it for:

  1. A collection of readings on a syllabus so that all students have open access to materials,
  2. A reading list for a course,
  3. A course-in-a- box, the box being the archive,
  4. Resources for those with low bandwidth (put it on a USB drive),
  5. Archiving government sites that are precarious,
  6. Check out how NetFreedomPioneers are using Webrecorder.io in their Project Toosheh to archive the net for parts of the world with no net access using filecasting,
  7. Save live video broadcasts and check out this use of Periscope and Webrecorder.io

  8. Old applets can live on like this one in Java that is unplayable otherwise.

  9. Creating self-contained journal articles like this one in Google’s new journal, Distill.

It is amazing and the possibilities just keep on rolling.  Add some more in the comments or feel free to hypothesize in the margins.