Blind Spots of Engagement

Here is a gif that shows what? Connectedness? Engagement?  Frequency? All of the above or none?

Here is the larger visualization.

Here are my notes on  #digciz tweets from Martin Hawksey’s event hashtag visualization :

I feel engaged with the subject digital citizenship and I am trying to “ante-up” by sharing digital objects that show I am an engaged digital traveller (Storify curation, comic, image quotes, #4wordstory).  What I found is that the gif  above shows I am engaged with people who already know me and are engaged with me.  According to the gif above, I haven’t engaged with any of the principals who have organized #digciz.

So…I have engaged on my end, but only a “few but fine” who want to play crack the whip with me on the other end.  I think this reveals a profound blindspot–if I put the food down where the goats can get to it, they will eat.  Nope.  It is very similar to the classic teacher trope–if I am teaching they are learning.  How does this blindspot feel?  Disappointing and discouraging.  And it hints that either I should dampen my enthusiasm or amplify it.  The former feels like folding and cutting my losses and the  latter like I am doubling down for no good reason other than stubborness (and the few folks who are engaged). Since time is a zero sum reality this feels risky, assuming that Hawksey’s tool measures something more than frequency and reciprocal direction.

2. I share=you share.  This observation dovetails with the number one above, but points to another blindspot:  I assume that because someone doesn’t reciprocate, that they are not a good #digciz.  Is this true?  Is reciprocation a central principle of being a good citizen online?  I use this gif frequently to argue for that position.

Is this true?  Does the visualization measure reciprocation? Is much of what happens in a “citizenship space” hidden just like much of nature is unrevealed and often an unknown unknown? Or is lurking one of those known unknowns that we fail to account for, that is impossible to account for?

Is this visualization good enough to be a roadmap?  I don’t think so for one main reason–it doesn’t take into account emotion.  Venkatesh Rao has some striking comments on this idea:

60/ Uncertainty shows up as felt emotions: anxiety at being late, exhilaration at beating odds, felt freedom at being early, anger at being betrayed, gratitude for being unexpectedly aided.

61/ Your roadmap is simply the landscape of upcoming known-unknowns (including, crucially, around people/trust) made legible enough for your instinctive management behaviors to kick in. 

62/ For this to happen, they must provide a sense of subjective proportion/importance in ways that cue emotional responses to people, events, and new information. 

63/ A roadmap that does not evoke emotion is not a roadmap.

I could argue that this viz amounts to a trust map, but only in the vaguest of ways. Frequency and double-headed arrows don’t equal trust.

3. I think the ultimate blindspot I am finally seeing is that engagement is risky.  It is a risk you choose to take or not.  I am used to giving away my self and go hang the risk, but when confronted with the roadmap visualization above I have to ask whether or not to keep on down this road with this map.  When you reach 60, this is not an idle question.

What I have decided, as John Boyd once remarked, is to fight the enemy, not the terrain.  Fight the blindspot, not the roadmap.  I will carry on for awhile with #digciz with a measure of leeriness and worldly weariness and some forced cheeriness, hoping that the game is worth the candle.

 

 

Slacking Is Not a Dirty Word

This morning I came across this post in Brainpickings apropos of Labor Day to come and May Day just passed.

Leisure, the Basis of Culture: An Obscure German Philosopher’s Timely 1948 Manifesto for Reclaiming Our Human Dignity in a Culture of Workaholism

I stripped out the relevant links using LinkGrabber and put them into Dropbox’s Papers. Since Papers doesn’t provide an embed (unlike its now open-source predecessor Hackpad did) I had to save it into Google Docs and get an embed from there. See below.

I then opened up Webrecorder.io in my browser and “archived” all the links I grabbed from the page.  Sorry for the generic embed below, but Webrecorder doesn’t appear to be embeddable. (Update: Yes it is!)

You can go to the link here.
Or you can download the desktop software, download the web archive, and view it there.

Now I get to ask: Why?

I have a webarchive of pages and objects from within all the pages I gathered.  That means text, images, and videos in this case.  You do not get any links inside the archive unless you have opened them while the recorder was  recording.

Perhaps I could use it for:

  1. A collection of readings on a syllabus so that all students have open access to materials,
  2. A reading list for a course,
  3. A course-in-a- box, the box being the archive,
  4. Resources for those with low bandwidth (put it on a USB drive),
  5. Archiving government sites that are precarious,
  6. Check out how NetFreedomPioneers are using Webrecorder.io in their Project Toosheh to archive the net for parts of the world with no net access using filecasting,
  7. Save live video broadcasts and check out this use of Periscope and Webrecorder.io

  8. Old applets can live on like this one in Java that is unplayable otherwise.

  9. Creating self-contained journal articles like this one in Google’s new journal, Distill.

It is amazing and the possibilities just keep on rolling.  Add some more in the comments or feel free to hypothesize in the margins.

 

An Invocation to “Come & Play”

Simon’s latest ramble ends with the invitation, “Come and play.”  Don’t mind if I do.

I remixed his long read into a video using the very interesting new browser tool, Lumen5.

Lumen5 allows you to ‘translate’ any web post into a multimedia production.  Here is my translation of Simon’s post. It feels a bit like a sliver to a much sharper and larger shard that is the original, but I got a good sense for this new tool and more importantly a better handle on Simon’s work.

Thanks, Simon, for letting me ‘trans-relate’ your synaptics.