Plan Yr Wrk, Wrk Yr Plan

I tell my students about the best piece of advice I ever got when my wife and I were running our chimney sweeping business. I tell them it made us a lot of money. I tell them we paid for our farm and home with this piece of advice. Now they’re attending. And what was that advice?

The owner of Copperfield Chimney Supply, Bob Daniels (Sooty Bob to everybody in the business) shared this piece of advice in a six-cassette pack of tapes which I wore out completely over the years. His advice was very simple:

So I repeat this to them ad  nauseum as they work their way through the process of asking and answering a “burning question” in their lives.

One of the tasks I ask of them is to create weekly research plans and then progress reports on the plans.  I do everything along with them, solidarity in learning dontcha know. Below is the assignment and my research plan for this week.

DEADLINE FOR RESEARCH PLAN: September 29, 2017

I want you to come up with a research plan for answering your I-Search question.  This might be a list of items you want to get done. Or it might be in paragraphs.  Make sure you prioritize. In other words, I want you to say what you will do first, second, third, etc.  If you can’t do the first item, move on to the second and so on.  Don’t let your priorities stop you from constantly moving forward.  Imagine you are a shark after your prey, the answer. You never stop moving forward.  We will discuss your plan and how you progressed through it at your conference.

Here is my research plan for the week. I will let you know how it went on Blackboard. You will have an opportunity to do so as well:

Get copy of MIchael Mosley’s book: Michael Mosley, The Clever Gut Diet.

Read Mosley’s book and mark it up looking for ways to combine it with my DayTwo data.

Prepare an email to my doctor on the kinds of bloodtests I want to include in my appointment next week.

Write my introduction where I tell my readers why I am pursuing the question.

Do a journalling exercise called feedforwarding where I imagine the results of my question as clearly as I can from 10,000 feet.

Clean up my I-Search outlines in Diigo.

Follow up on the forums I have visited and get more involved there:  quantified self forum and gut smart forum.

When they come for their conferences, we will chat about their plans and the progress they have made.  We will do this until their first draft is due in about three weeks–planning their work, working their plan, rinse, repeat.  

 

Music to “Conference” By

Next week my students and I will be having conferences over various projects we are working on.  While I was looking over my feeds this morning I came across an idea from Russell Tarr-create collaborative music playlists on Spotify for the half hour we spend together to be played to set the tone for our work.

Here is my start of the playlist.  You can add to it if you please, but I will be inviting students to contribute as well with the idea of using this in class as well.

Slacking Is Not a Dirty Word

This morning I came across this post in Brainpickings apropos of Labor Day to come and May Day just passed.

Leisure, the Basis of Culture: An Obscure German Philosopher’s Timely 1948 Manifesto for Reclaiming Our Human Dignity in a Culture of Workaholism

I stripped out the relevant links using LinkGrabber and put them into Dropbox’s Papers. Since Papers doesn’t provide an embed (unlike its now open-source predecessor Hackpad did) I had to save it into Google Docs and get an embed from there. See below.

I then opened up Webrecorder.io in my browser and “archived” all the links I grabbed from the page.  Sorry for the generic embed below, but Webrecorder doesn’t appear to be embeddable. (Update: Yes it is!)

You can go to the link here.
Or you can download the desktop software, download the web archive, and view it there.

Now I get to ask: Why?

I have a webarchive of pages and objects from within all the pages I gathered.  That means text, images, and videos in this case.  You do not get any links inside the archive unless you have opened them while the recorder was  recording.

Perhaps I could use it for:

  1. A collection of readings on a syllabus so that all students have open access to materials,
  2. A reading list for a course,
  3. A course-in-a- box, the box being the archive,
  4. Resources for those with low bandwidth (put it on a USB drive),
  5. Archiving government sites that are precarious,
  6. Check out how NetFreedomPioneers are using Webrecorder.io in their Project Toosheh to archive the net for parts of the world with no net access using filecasting,
  7. Save live video broadcasts and check out this use of Periscope and Webrecorder.io

  8. Old applets can live on like this one in Java that is unplayable otherwise.

  9. Creating self-contained journal articles like this one in Google’s new journal, Distill.

It is amazing and the possibilities just keep on rolling.  Add some more in the comments or feel free to hypothesize in the margins.