Slacking Is Not a Dirty Word

This morning I came across this post in Brainpickings apropos of Labor Day to come and May Day just passed.

Leisure, the Basis of Culture: An Obscure German Philosopher’s Timely 1948 Manifesto for Reclaiming Our Human Dignity in a Culture of Workaholism

I stripped out the relevant links using LinkGrabber and put them into Dropbox’s Papers. Since Papers doesn’t provide an embed (unlike its now open-source predecessor Hackpad did) I had to save it into Google Docs and get an embed from there. See below.

I then opened up Webrecorder.io in my browser and “archived” all the links I grabbed from the page.  Sorry for the generic embed below, but Webrecorder doesn’t appear to be embeddable. (Update: Yes it is!)

You can go to the link here.
Or you can download the desktop software, download the web archive, and view it there.

Now I get to ask: Why?

I have a webarchive of pages and objects from within all the pages I gathered.  That means text, images, and videos in this case.  You do not get any links inside the archive unless you have opened them while the recorder was  recording.

Perhaps I could use it for:

  1. A collection of readings on a syllabus so that all students have open access to materials,
  2. A reading list for a course,
  3. A course-in-a- box, the box being the archive,
  4. Resources for those with low bandwidth (put it on a USB drive),
  5. Archiving government sites that are precarious,
  6. Check out how NetFreedomPioneers are using Webrecorder.io in their Project Toosheh to archive the net for parts of the world with no net access using filecasting,
  7. Save live video broadcasts and check out this use of Periscope and Webrecorder.io

  8. Old applets can live on like this one in Java that is unplayable otherwise.

  9. Creating self-contained journal articles like this one in Google’s new journal, Distill.

It is amazing and the possibilities just keep on rolling.  Add some more in the comments or feel free to hypothesize in the margins.

 

A Tech Praxis Story

Here we go, @le_petitjo.

I put together a newsletter on a daily basis using the Nuzzel platform. I like it because it can be a robo-newsletter (Nuzzel collects the stories from my feeds and publishes with my comments) or it can be customized so that all stories are curated and commented upon. Or any mix in between. I feel my comments in the newsletter (which are limited to about twice the length of a tweet) are a conversational snippet. I wish they would open up into full blown dialogues, but that hasn’t happened yet, but maybe I am moving toward this with a recent exchange of tweets with @le_petitjo.

Here is the template I mention in the newsletter: Michael Hyatt – Book Insights Template.  I used it in class on a sample document (a NYTimes editorial board piece) and asked my students to use it on an article of their own choosing.

Last Friday we discussed how they used the template.  There were those who didn’t do the work.  They effectively removed themselves from the conversation.  I don’t know any way around that. There were those who did the work as strategic students. In other words they filled in the blanks without really thinking about the tool itself.  (Just tell me how to get my “A”, Mr. Elliott.) And there were those who modified the template to do the work.  Our conclusion was that templates are useful, but only insofar as they help us do the intellectual work that needs doing and only insofar as they can be freely modified to do that work.  They are useful can openers.

Pretty proud of their discussion.  I find the template as is to be very helpful at the beginning of a new project, but I do have better tools for gathering basic bibliographic information.  I use Zotero.  Then I use the “Notes” section of Zotero along with the template, but I do my first read and annotation with paper copies.  Sorry trees.  I know I could do more with tools like Diigo and Hypothes.is, but I get a haptic charge out of using a fountain pen on paper along with pretty highlighting and marker pens.

Here is a link to the first page of my annotated article:  articleannotated 2.

Below is a screencast from my Zotero account I mention above:

Using Zotero with Michael Hyatt’s Book Insight’s Template

Uploaded by TERRY ELLIOTT on 2017-02-20.

As usual, thinking and doing out loud in the classroom is messy.  It needs to be.  We need to habituate good tool use and then we need to rotate in and out among the tools we use, sometimes analog and sometimes digital and sometimes both to keep them fresh AND apt.

I am lucky to have a set of open and free tools that many other folk have developed for all to use. I am lucky to have been in the position to learn how to use them and teach their use to others.  In the end, I am lucky to be able to let people find their own idiosyncratic ways to answer the important questions in their lives.

OK, le_petitjo, that’s what happened.  Yeah, I know, a bit underwhelming, but there it is, teaching often hides the extraordinary inside the ordinary, almost never in plain sight.

 

 

Playing with Google Explore

I am taking my first week of class for journalismclass.org’s “Data Exploration and Storytelling”.  I ran across a great quote and wanted to ‘visualize’ it using SnagIt.  I saved it to Google Drive and then I remembered reading about the new, Google Explore (which must be another iteration of Google Research).

Here is an embed of all the discoveries I made and added using Google Explore. Here is the link if you want to go there.

It was fun.  I think this might  be a feature that sticks with Google Drive.   I can see how it might be a fun way to do #netnarr improv or #netprov.  Check out Howard Rhinegold’s interview with Mark Marino and Rob Wittig as they discuss it.

Mark Marino and Rob Wittig on Netprov from Connected Learning Alliance on Vimeo.

Or carry on another conversation here: